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Be the Fountain

fountain

            Fountains attract people. Water sprays upward, falling gently in eye-catching splendor. Bubbling fountains gurgle soft whispers, soothing one’s very soul.

Fountains renew and refresh, even heal. Spend time at the heart of a fountain. Depart rejuvenated.

The Heartland Fountain anthology project is offering a free class on June 6, 2015, from 10:00 a.m. to noon. This class is open to those who wish to have their writing considered for inclusion in our second volume of Oklahoma: The Fountain of the Heartland. The presentation will be held at the Clubhouse at Hunter’s Creek located at 1000 Villas Creek Drive in Edmond, Oklahoma.

Come learn how to “Be the Fountain.”

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 DIRECTIONS:

Go north on Kelly Avenue from downtown Edmond.  Just before arriving at the intersection of Kelly Avenue and Coffee Creek Road, you will notice, on the west side of Kelly, an entrance into the residential community of Villas at Hunter’s Creek.  That street turning in is Villas Creek Drive.  As you go through the gates, you will see the Clubhouse directly ahead, next to the swimming pool.  (Note:  On the east side of Kelly Avenue, directly across from the entrance to Villas at Hunter’s Creek, you will notice the Coffee Creek Golf Club.)

directions

The deadline to submit short stories and poems for Heartland Fountain’s second anthology volume has been extended due to circumstances beyond our control.  The new deadline date for submissions is August 8, 2015. For complete details about submissions, please refer to our April 8, 2014 announcement .

Cheryl Capps Roach, author and artist

Cheryl Capps Roach, author and artist

The Pioneer Woman Museum in Ponca City was the scene last Saturday of our third and final series of presentations on Oklahoma women. During this spring series, the Museum graciously hosted three presentations by Heartland Fountain, LLC and special guest speakers.

Saturday’s program, Lessons from the Heartland: Spotlight on Women, featured noted genealogist and author, Cheryl Capps Roach, and Heartland Fountain LLC’s chair and author, Donna Le. The audience of fifteen represented several different states.

Cheryl spoke about her family history, particularly her grandparents (Glen and Bertha Beatty) who moved from Pennsylvania to Oklahoma during the oil boom. In 1929, Cheryl’s grandfather died working in a Drumright oil field the week before the stock market crashed. After the crash, Bertha learned the crash had wiped out all of the money they deposited in the bank. Cheryl wisely observed that we learn from those who don’t necessarily have charmed lives, but rather are survivors – like her grandmother.

Cheryl’s award-winning story about her grandmother, “An Ordinary Person in an Extraordinary Time,” won first place in the 2011 Story Writing contest sponsored by the Oklahoma Genealogical Society. Another of her excellent stories is “Searching for My Grandfathers: From the North Seas to the Oklahoma Oil Pools.”

Portrait by Cheryl Capps Roach (Cheryl on left, Donna Le on right)

Portrait by Cheryl Capps Roach (Cheryl on left, Donna Le on right)

For most of us, it came as a wonderful surprise to learn just how talented Cheryl is artistically. While searching her family’s genealogy, she came across an old black and white photograph taken of her grandmother on her wedding day. Cheryl decided to do the above portrait from the photograph. We think you’ll agree it is stunning.

Donna Le, author and chair of Heartland Fountain, LLC

Donna Le, author and chair of Heartland Fountain, LLC

Continuing the theme of wisdom learned from others, author Donna Le spoke about numerous Oklahoma women, reviewing their published non-fiction and fiction works. She encouraged attendees to daily strive to improve their lives, moving forward with endurance.

Reading from Robert Fulgham‘s 1990 book, All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten, Donna shared his list of some of the things he learned in the sandpile at Sunday School.

Donna reminded us of the statue erected in front of the Pioneer Woman Museum. Erected in 1930, it depicts a confident, dignified pioneer woman and her young son striding forward, into new and strange lands, ready to begin a new life. Hopefully, a better life.

pioneerwomanstatue

 

Independent Landman at Gloria Belair, CPL

Independent Landman at Gloria Belair, CPL

P.S. Throughout our spring series, J.W. Cobbs Restaurant in Ponca City provided their famously-delicious pies. Thought you would appreciate the enjoyment we had from the pies as expressed by one of Oklahoma’s noted oil and gas landmen – Gloria Belair!

Heartland Fountain, LLC and special guest, Cheryl Capps Roach, will be at the Pioneer Woman Museum in Ponca City, Oklahoma, on Saturday, June 21st.  We will present a program, “Lessons from the Heartland: Spotlight on Women,” from 10:00 AM to 12:00 Noon. If you reside in or near Ponca City, we hope you will be with us for this special event.

Cheryl Capps Roach, Genealogist

Cheryl Capps Roach, Genealogist

Cheryl is a well-known genealogist, and author of Searching for My Grandfathers: From the North Seas to the Oklahoma Oil Pools. You can visit her webpage on GenealogyWise website.

If you have never visited the Pioneer Woman Museum, this will also be an opportunity for you to enjoy the outstanding facility and its myriad historical collections highlighting Oklahomans.

Heartland Fountain, LLC, cordially invites you to be with us in Ponca City on June 21st to enjoy the special presentations, along with delicious pies from J.W. Cobbs Restaurant.

Hope to see you there ….

Best of Books, Edmond, OK

Best of Books, Edmond, OK

Yesterday (14 June 2014), some of the authors whose works are included in Oklahoma: The Fountain of the Heartland, as well as photographer Edward Gonzales (who provided the anthology’s beautiful front cover) gathered at Best of Books in Edmond, OK.  It was a beautiful day for meeting the public and signing several copies of the anthology.

This young man, a recent university graduate, was the first customer:

Photographer Edward Gonzales and LLC Chair, Donna Le, greet the first customer.

Photographer Edward Gonzales and LLC Chair, Donna Le, greet the first customer.

If you were unable to visit with us yesterday, we left a few copies of the anthology with Best of Books, Edmond, OK. If you would like to order online, you will find Oklahoma: The Fountain of the Heartland in both soft-cover and e-book at Amazon.com.

Here are more photos from yesterday’s book signing:

Maria Veres signing book for customer

Maria Veres signing book for customer

 

Edward Gonzales and Donna Le signing books for customers

Edward Gonzales and Donna Le signing books for customers

Karen Graham signing book for customer

Karen Graham signing book for customer

S.L. Winchester signing books for customers

S.L. Winchester signing books for customers

 

Happy Reading!

Upcoming Book Signing!

Several authors whose works are contained in our anthology, Oklahoma: The Fountain of the Heartland, will be in Edmond this coming Saturday – 14 June. From 1:00pm to 2:30pm, they will be meeting the public and signing copies of the anthology.

Best of Books-Edmond is located in Kickingbird Square at the intersection of Danforth Road and Bryant Avenue.

 

Best of Books, Edmond, OK

Best of Books, Edmond, OK

 

Best of Books, Edmond, OK

Best of Books, Edmond, OK

 

We’re looking forward to seeing you Saturday!

 

 

 

This is the ninth in a series of annotations on writing from award-winning author, Michael W. Hinkle. A graduate of the University of Oklahoma Law School, Michael practiced twenty-five years as a trial lawyer in state and federal courts throughout the United States. Michael’s reputation and success led to his being listed as one of the best lawyers in America. Since retiring in 2005, his exceptional work as a nationally-read columnist and author have gained him wide notoriety.

 

Annotation on Nero Wolfe’s 1939 novel, Over My Dead Body

Over My Dead Body is a Nero Wolfe novel published by Rex Stout in 1939 crafted very much from the Sherlock Holmes mold. The story chronicles the detective skills of Nero Wolfe as seen through the eyes of Archie Goodwin, his assistant and self-described “confidential secretary.” Stout’s work is notable for the snappy dialogue, the sophisticated plot and the interesting characters. Each member of the cast is endowed with a distinct, full-bodied personality – especially Wolfe and Godwin, the first-person narrator.

For example, we are informed, throughout the book, of Wolf’s eccentric habits. He is fascinated by orchids and cultivates thousands of them in a glassed in area on the roof of his residence. He spends the morning from 9 o’clock to 11 o’clock attending these orchids and never goes down to his office before 11 o’clock. Prior to that time, he is never available for conference. Promptly at 11:00, an assistant delivers a “beer tray.” Chapter 1.

He is very fat and has an enormous appetite. He never discusses or thinks about business while he eats. From four in the afternoon until six in the evening, he returns to his orchids. Chapter 2. Adjacent to his office is a camouflaged listening station with “peepholes” which allow Goodwin to overhear what goes on when Wolf pretends to dismiss him from a “supposedly private” conversation. Chapter 6

Wolf has a fascinating back story. At 25, he was a secret agent for the Austrian government. During World War I, he fought against the Germans and the Austrians. Following the war, he lived temporarily in Montenegro. He was jailed for a time in Yugoslavia and released under pressure from the American government.

He claims he never leaves his residence except in extraordinary circumstances and, indeed, does not leave in the course of the novel. Chapter 12.

In regard to work, Archie comments, at one point, “He never puts off till tomorrow what I can do today.” Chapter 10

No matter what obligations he assumes relative to defending someone’s interests, he is always primarily concerned with “My own. Always my own.” He turns down a $10,000 retainer. The insistent client promises that, in the event he finds the assignment distasteful, he can simply return the money. “No sir. To return that amount of money would ruin my digestion for a week.” Chapter 15

Confronting a man trying to interfere with Archie’s instructions to bring a woman to Wolfe’s office, Archie tells him, “Whatever Nero Wolfe wants, he gets or he has a tantrum and I get fired.” Chapter 16

At the end of the book, when he discovers that his purported client is a murderer, he arranges for her to leave his house under the nose of the chief of homicide. Once she’s gone, he exposes her and furnishes the means of identification. The chief explodes, “And she is – and by God, you had one of my men take her and turn her loose –“

“I did. What else could I do? She was sitting here in my office, thinking she was my client, under my protection. I didn’t agree to catch the murderer for you, I agreed to disclose the identity and the motive.”

Moments later, the murderess returns to his home and lunges at Wolfe with a dagger. He kills her in self-defense–with an empty beer bottle. Before he provided the means for her departure, however, he arranged to have an envelope placed into her hand with a one sentence message, “… saying that she was not my client, and, under the terms as stated, never had been.” A nice exclamation point highlighting his commitment to ethical proprieties. Chapter 19

Stout has created an eccentric character whose unusual behavior adds appeal to the interesting workings of a brilliant mind.

Michael W. Hinkle

Michael W. Hinkle